Wingnuts

Another Bundy Militiaman Has Been Arrested At His Own Request

A man who participated in the occupation of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge in Oregon was arrested yesterday under somewhat bizarre circumstances.

Texas native Scott A. Willingham apparently wanted to be arrested and, to that end, he threatened to shoot federal officers and was apprehend in Mount Vernon, Oregon.

[Grant County District Attorney Jim Carpenter] said that during the arraignment, Willingham said he wanted to be jailed in Grant County to await arrest by federal authorities for his role in the occupation.

A Grant County sheriff's deputy arrested Willingham at a motel after Willingham said that if he wasn't jailed Wednesday, he would "start shooting federal law enforcement officers" the next morning, Carpenter said.

Willingham had a semi-automatic rifle with 230 rounds of .308-caliber ammunition at the time of his arrest, Carpenter said.

Why would Willingham specifically request to be jailed in Grant County?

The short answer is paranoia. The long answer is more complicated.

As you may recall, several members of the Bundy militia left the wildlife refuge during the occupation and visited Grant County Sheriff Glenn Palmer who was sympathetic to their cause. Sheriff Palmer reportedly even asked the men to autograph his pocket copy of the Constitution.

Yesterday's report from the Oregonian does not explicitly spell out Willingham's motivation for asking to be arrested, but it certainly appears that Willingham believed federal authorities intended to kill him and that the Grant County Sheriff's office would protect him.

Grant County Sheriff Glenn Palmer is currently under investigation by state authorities for his cooperation with the Bundy militia. Willingham has been charged by local authorities with unlawful use of a weapon and disorderly conduct. Federal charges have not yet been filed against Willingham but, in that event, the number of individuals connected to the Bundy family facing federal charges will increase to 35.

In related news, Ryan Bundy has decided to represent himself at trial. That should be a hoot.

  • mnpollio

    Why do all of these Militia people look similar to Ted Nugent (i.e., like that scary thing you expect to find under that gross mossy rock in your back yard)?

  • TJ2000

    Who knows – may the ‘feds’ would kill in cold blood. They obviously fired on Payne (In LaVoys Pickup) at the first stop, then fired on him purposely trying to kill him as he approached the road block, fired on him as he first got out, and finally killed him.

    The Bundys do stand on the legal and moral high ground. Like it or not; Its clear to anyone who looks into the matter. “Anti-Terrorism and Death Penalty” charges for a brush fire??? Common. Read the Constitution already people.

    U.S. Constitution; which has already gotten put on a shelf and ignored.
    https://www.govtrack.us/congress/bills/110/hr1359

    and the soils under them, were not granted by the Constitution to the United States, [[[but were reserved to the States respectively]]]. Secondly, the new States have the same rights, sovereignty, and jurisdiction over this subject as the original States. Thirdly, the right of the United States to the public lands, and the power of Congress to make all needful rules and regulations for the sale and disposition thereof, [[[conferred no power to grant to the plaintiffs the land in controversy]]] in this case. The judgment of the Supreme Court of the [[[State of Alabama is]]], therefore, affirmed.
    https://supreme.justia.com/cases/federal/us/44/212/case.html

  • TJ2000

    I support the Bundy cause – but Sheriff Ward was right; these protests seem to draw in some crazy people.

    Right fight – wrong tactic perhaps.

    • Perhaps? Wrong fight, wrong tactic, wrong everything.

      • TJ2000

        They stand on the legal and moral high ground. Like it or not; Its clear to anyone who looks into the matter. “Anti-Terrorism and Death Penalty” charges for a brush fire??? Common.

        and the soils under them, were not granted by the Constitution to the United States, [[[but were reserved to the States respectively]]]. Secondly, the new States have the same rights, sovereignty, and jurisdiction over this subject as the original States. Thirdly, the right of the United States to the public lands, and the power of Congress to make all needful rules and regulations for the sale and disposition thereof, [[[conferred no power to grant to the plaintiffs the land in controversy]]] in this case. The judgment of the Supreme Court of the [[[State of Alabama is]]], therefore, affirmed.
        https://supreme.justia.com/cases/federal/us/44/212/case.html

        • Christopher Foxx

          They stand on the legal and moral high ground.

          Performing illegal acts like taking over and defacing property that doesn’t belong to them is a legal high ground? Threatening to kill their fellow citizens is a moral high ground?

          • TJ2000

            WHERE did they threaten to kill anyone? Let me guess; you’re gonna focus all your attention on the 50-seconds of Sean Anderson.

            You will always have some piddly excuse to hate them, “but, but, they protested on public property. but, but, they had guns on them. but, but, they tried to make demands”. Its pathetic really. The major demeanor was a peaceful protest to bring the issue to light. Yes, perhaps they went a little over board – that’s no excuse to hate.

          • Christopher Foxx

            WHERE did they threaten to kill anyone?

            You really ought to actually read the articles you’re commenting on.

            Willingham said that if he wasn’t jailed Wednesday, he would “start shooting federal law enforcement officers”

            you’re gonna focus all your attention on the 50-seconds of Sean Anderson

            Don’t need to, as there are plenty of other examples. But it’s telling that you’re pointing to someone doing exactly what you’re trying to claim they never did.

          • TJ2000

            That was WAY AFTER. It was not even by any of the Bundy’s main group of protesters. Willingham did that ON PURPOSE so they would arrest him. Witch Hunt away.

            Perhaps a few involved should be taken seriously; that wouldn’t include the main group. This dragnet approach and labeling and prosecuting is just a form of witch hunting.

          • Christopher Foxx

            “That guy? Who was part of that group? And did that thing that I don’t want to admit he did? That guy? Who was part of that group? Well, I’m going to claim he wasn’t part of that group, and if he was part of that group he didn’t do that thing, and if he did do that thing it doesn’t count.”

            “Because that’s how I have to twist reality to get the answer I want.”

    • Christopher Foxx

      I support the Bundy cause

      And just what is that, exactly? Ignoring any laws you don’t like, pointing loaded weapons at duly authorized law enforcement officers, taking over land and facilities that don’t belong to you, threatening to assault and kill fellow citizens?

      I’m sincerely interested. Just what is the “Bundy cause”?

      • TJ2000

        The cause was States and Local representation for local people and property. If you read your Constitution it will all make sense. As for the rest of your comment; just a bunch of LIES, LIES, and more LIES.

  • muselet

    It’s possible Scott Willingham believed the feds were going to ice him. He’s certainly paranoid enough to think that way.

    It’s also possible he was terrified some sovereign citizen would decide his is the redacted name on the current federal indictment and bust a cap in his arse. That seems more likely to me.

    Does anyone else think it would be fitting for Willingham and Glenn Palmer to await trial in adjacent cells?

    –alopecia

  • gescove

    The argle bargle offered up in court by sovereign citizen types serving as their own counsel is generally not well received by judges.

    • Victor the Crab

      Ah, but what I wouldn’t give to be in that courtroom to see these Bizzaro Perry Masons try and defend themselves to whomever is sitting behind the bench. I just hope they let me bring in the popcorn.

      • muselet

        There are some videos online of sovereign citizens defending themselves in court (for which, read “floundering around trying to convince the court up is down and black is white”). It’s not a pretty sight.

        Watching these yahoos irk judges isn’t nearly as fun as you might think.

        –alopecia

        • Victor the Crab

          One would hope those judges would act decisively in those situations.

          • muselet

            Judges can’t just lower the boom, much as they might want to, but they really don’t like having their time wasted.

            This is a run-in with a hearing officer, but see for yourself how things go:

            As I said, not nearly as entertaining as you might expect.

            –alopecia

          • Wow, that guy is a complete moron.

          • muselet

            In other words, typical of the breed.

            –alopecia

  • Nefercat

    Clueless pack of kibblebrains, aren’t they?

  • Aynwrong

    Sort of off topic, has Jones or Bidondi jumped on this bandwagon yet?

    • JMAshby

      Could you be more specific? There have been numerous conspiracy theories about the Bundy occupation. I think my favorite theory was the idea that they’re actually government agents just trying to discredit the patriot movement.

      It worked!

      • Aynwrong

        I just haven’t heard about them supporting the “cause” of the militia idiots.

        Granted I don’t ever go to their sites. I just wait for Bob & Chez to laugh at them.

        • JMAshby

          As a general rule, if something doesn’t turn out well for the cause, they will either A) ignore it and pretend it didn’t happen or B) say it was a false flag.