National Security Trade

Trump Regime Quietly Delays Another Bad Decision For Americans

JM Ashby
Written by JM Ashby

The Trump regime has already delayed their decision to prohibit American companies from selling equipment to Chinese-owned telecommunications giants Huawei once, but now they're doing it again.

Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross announced this morning that export controls have been delayed for another 90 days and his rationale for the delay is quite revealing.

The decision permits Huawei to continue buying products from American companies to support its existing customers. It was made in part to minimize disruption in parts of rural America that rely on relatively inexpensive Huawei equipment to carry wireless service in remote areas, Commerce officials said.

"It is another 90 days for the U.S. telecom companies," Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross said on Fox Business Network. "Some of the rural companies are dependent on Huawei. So we're giving them a little more time to wean themselves off."

It's not being covered or framed this way, but this is another subtle admission that Trump's policies are ultimately worse for American companies and consumers, not Chinese companies.

In this specific case, American companies are being told that they cannot sell their products to Huawei because their products somehow pose a threat to national security. And yet those American products are being used by Huawei here inside the United States, so where is the danger?

As I've often said, I'm not qualified to say if Huawei poses as much of a threat to national security as the Trump regime claims it does, but the casual napkin math doesn't add up here.

If selling American goods to Huawei is as much of a threat to national security as they say, why has the decision to add Huawei to the blacklist or "entity list" been delayed for so long? Where's the urgency? Is the sky falling, or is it not?

I believe sanctions were imposed on Huawei for political reasons, not for economic or security reasons, and the Trump regime has tried to reverse-engineer a justification for it after the fact. I believe Trump demanded another lever he could pull against China and this is what his lackeys gave him. And now they're picking up the pieces and delaying sanctions for as long as they can.

It can be true that China's far reach into the global telecommunications industry is a long-term threat to national security and true that that's not the real reason why Trump called for sanctions.

  • muselet

    “It is another 90 days for the U.S. telecom companies,” Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross said on Fox Business Network. “Some of the rural companies are dependent on Huawei. So we’re giving them a little more time to wean themselves off.”

    Erm … it takes longer than 90 days to source, purchase, install and integrate new equipment into telco networks. Wilbur Ross probably knows that.

    But Donald Trump doesn’t, so off Ross goes to peddle this nonsense on TV. It would be humiliating if Ross had any sense of personal dignity.

    Is Huawei a threat to national security? If the scuttlebutt about backdoors in the company’s equipment is to be believed, yes. Is it a major threat? Not yet, and not if the US government uses end-to-end encryption for wireless communications (giving the Chinese government an even larger haystack to search for super-duper top secret needles). It would be nice not to have to worry about such things, but such is reality.

    –alopecia

  • waspuppet

    “Is the sky falling, or is it not?”

    “Threat to national security” is just one of those catchphrases Trump uses, like “Article II,” that he thinks means he can do anything he wants.

    Though I guess as long as his fellow Republicans, especially in the Senate, hate America as much as he does, he kind of can.