Congress

Democrats Plan to Permanently Reduce Child Poverty

SK Ashby
Written by SK Ashby

The White House and congressional Democrats in early talks about a large infrastructure and jobs bill that could top $4 trillion in total spending, but a package that large may not necessarily be strictly limited to physical infrastructure projects.

The child tax credits included in the American Rescue Plan are only temporary and will expire next year, but some Democrats are proposing that make the tax credits permanent and include them in the infrastructure bill.

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer said that making enhanced child tax credits permanent is an important goal for Democrats, as they seek to move forward with bold new initiatives that also include legislation to upgrade U.S. infrastructure. [...]

“That’s one of the most important things we can do. We can change America, if we make them permanent,” Schumer told MSNBC. “It will be so good for these kids, their families, but for all of America and our economy.”

Nearly 11 million, or one in seven, U.S. children live in poverty, the Center for American Progress, a progressive think tank, estimates.

I don't know if a permanent expansion of the child tax credit will be included in the infrastructure bill, but Democrats should campaign on this in any case and especially if it isn't.

Republicans are lost in a culture war morass where they're chasing their own tails in circles around "cancel culture" and transgender girls who want to swim or play basketball. Democrats have an opportunity to make the choice between them and the GOP as clear as it has ever been.

With five Republican senators retiring next year, Democrats should focus on policy issues and delivering results even if the results are incremental. Give people things they can actually see, feel, and use.

Republicans can't campaign on tangible benefits because governing isn't really their thing. They aren't going to run on new spending in the 2022 midterm elections; they're going to run against minorities.