Fraud

One of Trump’s Lawyers is Under Investigation

JM Ashby
Written by JM Ashby

The Guardian reported this week that Trump lawyer Jay Sekulow has directed tens of millions of dollars of charity money to himself and his family.

If that sounds illegal to you, some state authorities apparently agree. The states of New York and North Carolina have opened an investigation of Sekulow's charity.

North Carolina Attorney General Josh Stein and New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman will be looking into Jay Sekulow’s Christian Advocates Serving Evangelism (CASE) for any evidence of wrongdoing. As the Guardian reported, Sekulow signed off on documents pressuring poor and unemployed donors to make a “sacrificial gift” to CASE despite their financial hardship. He, his family and their businesses have raked in over $60 million in compensation and contracts through the charity since 2000, according to the report.

I can't say I feel any measure of sympathy for the poor Christian families that were allegedly scammed by Sekulow.

You can't really say they donated to a worthy cause because, according to The Guardian, Sekulow's charity asked people to donate to stop abortion, stop Planned Parenthood, stop Obamacare, stop immigration, and stop "Muslim terrorists" and "Islamic extremists."

“Islamic extremists are headed in your direction, and you are most likely the main target,” Sekulow himself told people in a recorded message used in fundraising calls during 2011. Telemarketers were instructed to tell people who initially said they could not donate that Islamist extremists “will succeed if we don’t do something RIGHT AWAY.” [...]

Case’s marketing callers have focused on grim stories about abortion year after year. People who initially resisted a request to donate money in 2012 were told: “Unbelievably, through Obamacare, Planned Parenthood could run a healthcare clinic in your child’s or grandchild’s middle school or high school and receive federal tax dollars to do it”.

Now, even if you were a right wing nutcase who wants to stop these imaginary threats, how exactly is donating to Sekulow's charity going to stop any of them? How is that suppose to work?

I will say this: using someone's religious beliefs to exploit them in this manner is damnable even if they're idiots. Them being idiots kind of makes it worse, because Sekulow isn't an idiot. He's actually one of those rich, educated coastal elites we're always hearing about and he used religion to con morons in the middle America out of millions of dollars. He knew exactly what he was doing. He thinks they're just as dumb as we do.

  • Username1016

    Seriously, two VERY different cultures. If anyone told me, “…through Obamacare, Planned Parenthood could run a healthcare clinic in your child’s or grandchild’s middle school or high school and receive federal tax dollars to do it,” I would be all for it and ask how I could help!

  • Badgerite

    I am so shocked. Oh wait. No I’m not.

  • muselet

    Jay Sekulow first came to my attention in the late 1980s, when he infested the radio in Southern California. He was less overtly hysterical than others on Christian radio—he didn’t claim secular humanists were going to kill good Christians in their beds, just that they hated Christians and democracy and America—but his arguments were all purest sophistry.

    That Sekulow would (allegedly) go on to fleece the rubes for millions doesn’t surprise me in the least. I’d have been surprised if he had turned out to be honest and sincere.

    –alopecia

  • Nefercat

    “Sekulow’s charity asked people to donate to stop abortion, stop Planned Parenthood, stop Obamacare, stop immigration, and stop “Muslim terrorists” and “Islamic extremists.”
    ——————————
    Charity? Non-profit, maybe. Technically. Charity? I don’t think so.
    char·i·ty
    noun: charity; plural noun: charities
    1. an organization set up to provide help and raise money for those in need.
    2. the voluntary giving of help, typically in the form of money, to those in need.
    3. kindness and tolerance in judging others.

  • Aynwrong

    Look up the history of a one Richard Viguerie, the so called pioneer of direct-mail and you realize that Jay Sekulow fleecing conservative voters like this is a practice that is deeply rooted in conservative politics. At this point, it’s tradition.

    From an article by Rick Pearlstien. It’s all about the history of this “long con.” Read down far enough and he gets to Viguerie. This has been going on for decades.
    https://thebaffler.com/salvos/the-long-con

    “Following the Goldwater defeat, Viguerie went into business for himself. He famously visited the Clerk of the House of Representatives, where the identities of those who donated fifty dollars or more to a presidential campaign then by law reposed. First alone, and then with a small army of “Kelly Girls” (as he put it to me in 1996), he started copying down the names and addresses in longhand until some nervous bureaucrat told him to cease and desist.

    By then, though, it was too late: Viguerie had captured some 12,500 addresses of the most ardent right-wingers in the nation. “And that list,” he wrote in his 2004 book, America’s Right Turn: How Conservatives Used New and Alternative Media to Take Over America, “was my treasure trove, as good as the gold bricks deposited at Fort Knox, as I started The Viguerie Company and began raising money for conservative clients.”

  • Aynwrong

    Conservatism is a grift.

    Christian Advocates Serving Evangelism (CASE)

    I suspect some snark will be had as state investigators make their case against CASE. Whoops, I’m snarking already.

    • Victor the Crab

      Add the following words at the beginning “New Un-Testamental”, and what you now have is NUTCASE.

    • Nefercat

      That caught my eye to. Ooh, lawyer using “case” as an acronym. Sooo clever, you grifting weasel.