Congress

Republicans Privately Reject An Infrastructure Funding Mechanism

JM Ashby
Written by JM Ashby

The idea that a federal investment of just $200 billion in infrastructure will somehow trigger $1 trillion in additional spending by states and private companies is obviously a fantasy, but where is that $200 billion suppose to come from?

According to the Washington Post, Trump has called for raising the gas tax at least twice in recent weeks to pay for his fake infrastructure plan but congressional Republicans immediately rejected it both times.

During a White House meeting with House Transportation Committee Chairman Bill Shuster (R-Pa.) several weeks ago, Trump mused about a gas tax increase to 50 cents per gallon, almost triple the current level, according to a person briefed on the exchange who requested anonymity to discuss White House deliberations. [...]

Trump, Cabinet members and GOP leaders also discussed the gas tax increase during joint meetings this weekend in Camp David. Sen. John Cornyn (R-Tex.), who attended the meetings, would not reveal who raised the subject of raising the gas tax, but he said there was no ambiguity about how Congress planned to proceed.

“I’m sure it came up in some context because that’s what a lot of people have proposed at different times,” Cornyn said. “But I have complete confidence that we will not be raising the gas tax.”

Now, 50 cents per gallon is obviously a ridiculous number and Trump clearly has no idea what he's saying, but there's virtually no chance congressional Republicans will raise the gas tax under any circumstances even if it were only 5 cents.

Recent reports suggest Trump's infrastructure plan may not even be released this month if ever, but if the White House does get around to it I think we can assume it will be dead on arrival.

The only way I can see congressional Republicans passing a so-called infrastructure bill is if it comes in the form of even more tax cuts for corporations.

  • Draxiar

    This may not be popular to say but I’m not opposed to taxes on gas being raised provided it goes towards the right things. If the tax increase sharpens the demand for electric vehicles, sustainable energy, and mass transit thereby severing our ties with fossil fuels I can live with that. Naturally it should be a progressive increase over time to allow for economic adjustments and so forth. The idea of a higher tax on gas though I don’t find to be inherently a terrible thing.

    Now in the case of funding an infrastructure plan it might be easier to swallow if they hadn’t just given the wealthy a big sloppy tax cut smoothie and anally raped the middle class and poor.

    • I don’t think you’re alone in that, and I support a gas tax increase too, except for gas taxes being regressive. I don’t like the idea of socking tax increases on the working poor.

      Of course, if Republicans realize it hurts the poor, they’ll probably jump aboard.

      • Draxiar

        The regressive nature of that sort of a tax had occurred to me…and I wouldn’t want that to happen to the working poor. Now if the tax overhaul had been friendlier so the working poor could afford or deduct…well that would be different.

  • muselet

    As long as Rs are in charge, infrastructure will simply continue to fall apart because cuting taxes on the rich and funneling more money to defense contractors is as close as they come to a coherent governing philosophy.

    Hell of a way to run a country.

    –alopecia

  • Aynwrong

    Why has no one in our so called liberal media even mentioned the name Grover Norquist all throughout the GOP tax scam bill being debated? It will eventually raise taxes on middle class citizens, which I thought was something the anti tax demigod opposed under all circumstances, no exceptions. I doubt he’ll oppose this for the same reason he didn’t oppose the scam bill. It raises taxes on working people, not GOP donors. I also doubt our media will notice.

    • ninjaf

      He should be drawn out into the public square for a good, old fashioned public shaming. Of course, he would have to first be capable of feeling shame.

  • Arthur Croft

    These guys are fucking idiots.
    We should be used to it by now.