Immigration

Trump Vows To End DACA In A Second Term

JM Ashby
Written by JM Ashby

I think everyone knows how high the stakes are in the next election, but Trump will make it increasingly clear the more he talks about all the horrible things he will do if reelected.

The Supreme Court did not necessarily say the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program is constitutional, only that the Trump regime did not follow proper procedure when making their plans to end it.

Trump said this morning that they'll make new plans.

In a tweet Friday morning, Trump said, “The Supreme Court asked us to resubmit on DACA, nothing was lost or won. They “punted” much like in a football game (where hopefully they would stand for our great American Flag). We will be submitting enhanced papers shortly.” [...]

Ken Cuccinelli, acting head of U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, said Friday that the administration was starting over. “We’re going to move as quickly as we can to put options in front of the president,” but those are executive branch options, he told “Fox & Friends.”

Trump said they'll submit a new plan "shortly," but it won't be that short. Proving even to lower federal courts that they got it right on the second try will take time and it will take even longer to work its way through another appeals process and through the Supreme Court.

Trump did not explicitly say this what he'll do if he's reelected for a second term, but that's how long it will take. This should be seen and covered as a campaign promise.

We can ensure that none of this happens by electing Joe Biden in November. Democrats can ensure we never have to worry about it again by electing a Democratic majority to the Senate that is willing to finally pass comprehensive immigration reform and put the issue to rest.

If Trump is reelected, he'll probably have a chance to replace at least one if not two Supreme Court justices and that would give conservatives a clear majority on the court even if Chief Justice John Roberts sides with the liberals on the biggest cases.

  • muselet

    Through executive action, Trump could still take away the ability for 650,000 young immigrants to live and work legally in the United States.

    Donald Trump may well try. There would be immediate court challenges and appeals and in the fullness of time the whole mess would end up in front of the Supremes, but I’m not sure Trump could resist the temptation to issue some executive orders.

    The scariest part of the AP article is this:

    USCIS deputy director for policy Joseph Edlow said in a statement that the court’s opinion “has no basis in law and merely delays the president’s lawful ability to end the illegal Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals amnesty program.”

    A Supreme Court decision has no basis in law? Wow. Banana republics got nothing on this administration.

    Congress needs to deal with this issue rather than leaving it to the malign whims of the administration. That won’t happen until after the summer recess, at the earliest; more likely it will come up next year, in the 117th Congress, when—I fervently hope—the Ds will have solid majorities in both houses, willing to work with Pesident Joseph Robinette Biden Jr.

    –alopecia